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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 62 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the willingness to work with drawing lines in the dust, we get a different phenomenon. mitch mcconnell took a much harder line, and it really was he has a mandate for his failed policies. that is not what this election was about. anything that happens now asked to meet the approval of the house republicans, or it is not going anywhere. that i think is in many ways also a false bluster, because what we see going on in the senate is riling change that mcconnell does not necessarily control, which is 48 senators from across the board working with the fix that debt coalition and the business community to come up with a simpson-bowles template. there will not be a plan. >> what you see is the scenario for the link up? >> especially on the fiscal cliff? >> you will not see much difference between this on this. mort, i think it is impossible to write serious law during a lame duck that would constitute an agreement with any substance other than, and something set up behind them once again, to go into the fact if the next congress does not actually produce them. but the idea that they could do something t
with the great. but there's another factor to keep in mind for 2014 are among those who are up in 2014, mitch mcconnell, john cornyn, lindsey graham, saxby chambliss. now, if you're mitch mcconnell and we've been sitting there for years ago we would have had unanimity that niche was keening of the republican party in kentucky. and that was not even a contest for who was the utterly acknowledged leader. and we get to the 2010 elections and he put every resource he could to every attempt, every string he could pull to keep rand paul from winning the republican nomination. and failed mr. luther if your looking at this from mcconnell's perspective, knowing that several other republicans who ran for the senate this time would not promise going in that they would support mitch mcconnell, and you know that you have the potential for a primary challenge at portage and no longer controlled, your willingness to compromise on some of these critical issues may be itself compromised. if you're john cornyn, you would've stayed out of the race for the republican nomination for the senate this time around, but you sat
's mark in akron, ohio. we want to show you the response by senate minority leader mitch mcconnell, republican of kentucky, who writes -- host: lindsey shultz sent us this message on facebook and says she agrees -- host: back to the phones. jay in cincinnati, ohio, is on our line for those making between $100,000 and $250,000 a year. jay, you're on the "washington journal." caller: yes, yes, sir, thank you for taking my call. i just got a quick comment to make. being somewhere in the middle class, slightly hedging up towards the upper middle, basically what i'm saying is what would really help me is -- and i think a lot of people like the tax bracket -- we did the right thing before the recession, during the recession. i just feel that they lift some of the mandates and tax it on the poor and give you access to your money for, like, say two years, you're allowed to take money out without getting clobbered. i think that would inject a lot of money inside the economy very fast. there's a lot of people that's got money that's invested, can't take money out, that can use the money for
. -- fort worth, texas. caller: president obama needs to draw a line in the sign and tell mitch mcconnell and john boehner -- they do not respect him. they do not respect him as a man. do not just give away anything. i used to pick cotton. he had to do with the man said. that is what the republican party wants obama to do. he can do anything, but he has to talk with the republican party first. host: matthew from louisiana, a republican caller. caller: good morning. i voted for mitt romney. the first time i ever voted for liberty, freedom, and the rights of our constitution. i have one thing from abraham lincoln i would like to read real quick. you cannot bring about prosperity by discouraging thrift. you cannot strengthen the weak by weakening the strong. you could not help the poor man by destroying the rich. it cannot come into the brotherhood of man by inciting class hatred. you could not encourage by taking away initiative and independence. you could not help small men by tearing down big men. you cannot lift the wage earner by pulling down the wage payer. you cannot keep out of troub
will be greater but there's another factor to keep in mind for 2014. among those who are up to 2014, mitch mcconnell, john cornyn, lindsey graham, saxby chambliss. if you are mitch mcconnell and we have been sitting here four years ago we would have had unanimity that mitch was king of the republican party in kentucky and there was not even a -- for the utterly acknowledged leader and then we get to the 2010 elections and he put every resource he could and every attempt, it every string he could pull to keep rand paul from winning the republican nomination and failed miserably. if you are looking at this from mcconnell's perspective knowing that several of the republicans who ran for the senate this time would not promise going in that they would support mitch mcconnell, and you know that you have the potential for a primary challenge and a party you no longer control, your willingness to compromise on some of these critical issues may be itself compromise. if you are john cornyn you would have stayed out of the race in the republican nomination for the senate this time around but you sat back and w
, except to mitch mcconnell. >> excuse me, you, mr. hoyer, mr. clyburn, you're all over 70. is it going to prohibit younger leadership from moving forward. >> so you're suggesting that everybody step aside? >> i'm simply saying, does this -- >> i think that what you will see, and let's, for a moment, honor it as a legitimate question. although it's quite offensive. but you don't realize that, i guess. the fact is, the fact is, is that everything that i have done in my almost decade of leadership is to elect younger and newer people to the congress. in my own personal experience, it was very important for me to elect young women. i came to congress when my youngest child, alexandra, was a senior in high school, practically on her way to college. i knew that my male colleagues had come when they were 30. they had a jump on me, because they didn't have to -- i did what i wanted to do. i was blessed to have that opportunity, to sequentially raise my family and then come to congress. but i wanted women to be here in greater numbers at an earlier age so that their seniority would start to acc
out maybe one year ago. and mitch mcconnell buried it. he did not want the information known. the news report is out there. i am sure you can find it. but mitch mcconnell was the one that buried it in did not want that publicly known that it is a fallacy. i want to ask, especially you, mr. representative, the last two years since you people have taken over, you have barely showed up for work. we are paying your salary. i do not see not one of you put any skin in this game. you are sitting there, you do not even show up for work for half of the two years of taken over. we are paying your salary, paying your benefits. i do not see you putting in the skin in the game. my my husband has been a steel worker. he has to work 60-to-80 hours a week. this notion of the 47% not paying taxes, and entitlement, my husband has been paid in into his benefits for 40 years. host: we will have the congressman respond, but let me ask you a question, what you think of increase in the age of people qualifying for medicare or social security? caller: my husband has been a steelworker for 37 years. my husband
to a generational thing. could either one of them make a deal stick within their caucuses? even if mcconnell and reid both tried to put something together, they have some exotic people on their side. you are absolutely right, and then toss in one more factor. you've got all the dysfunctional capitol hill, and then you have a president that basically has no relationship whatsoever with congress on either side. virtually no interaction with members of congress. wow. >> i don't agree with anything charlie just said. no, i agree with everything he just said. the key may be whether the president shows decisive leadership. i don't think decisive leadership necessarily is what he showed a lot of the time in the first term. not that he did not show any leadership. he did not get his hands really dirty. the public option fight we had, if you send it to may i will sign it. he let nancy pelosi take the lead on the public option, and on a lot of things. we knew what he preferred, but he did not twist arms. he just did not seem to get involved in the details. is he going to do that now? if he does that,
? [booing] >> next. next. you ask that question except to mitch mcconnell. >> you, mr. hoyer, mr. clyburn, you are all over 70. does it prohibit younger leadership from moving forward? >> so you're suggesting that everybody step aside? >> i'm saying it delays younger leadership. >> i think what you'll see -- let's for a moment honor it as a legitimate question. although it's quite offensive. the fact is -- the fact is is that everything that i have done in my almost -- i guess decade now of leadership, is to elect younger and newer people to the congress. in my own personal experience, it was very important for me to elect young women. i came to congress when my youngest child, alexandra, was a senior in high school, practically on her way to college. i knew that my male colleagues had come when they were 30. they had a jump on me because they didn't have -- i did what i wanted to do. i was blessed to have that opportunity to sequentially raise my family and come to congress. i wanted women to be here in greater numbers at an earlier age so that their seniority will start to count much so
[inaudible] i wonder what you heard or have you heard anything from senator mcconnell on what his role will be. >> i hope he and speaker baners, in most things they work together, and i guess on fiscal reform, senator -- speaker boehner has taken the lead. but my view is if that -- again, if we hear some voices from the mainstream republicans in the country, particularly business, it would make it a lot easier for senator mcconnell to come to an agreement -- come to part of that agreement. >> sam. >> a broad question on how you see the democratic party entering this phase of governance. >> i'll answer the second question first. i think democrats, we've -- you know, why for instance -- i think we've gotten much better at focusing both our policies and our message on middle class folks. i think we understand the dilemma that the middle -- the middle class -- just take a step back. you know, the american dream is so much part of us. you know, i like to say that beautiful lady in the harbor in the city in which i live holds a torch. that's the american dream of every american and to most p
chairman, mitch mcconnell, john boehner, and other republican leaders behind the epic election failure of 2012 should be replaced with leaders more in tune with the conservative base of the republican party. likewise, established republican consultants establishedkarl rove, romney campaign senior advisers, and pollsters should never be hired to run or consult on a national campaign again. nobody would give a dime to the ineffective super pacs like american crossroads. the loss was the death rattle of the establishment republican party. the disaster of 2012 signals the beginning of the battle to take over the republican party and the opportunity to establish the gop as the party of small government, constitutional conservative. host: do you agree with that assessment? guest: not at all. k i do karl rove, the pollster for the romney campaign, and all the others he listed, the republican national chairman -- they are not the problem. the truth is, while i think the tea party is a great addition to the party, the candidates who were truly identified as tea party candidates in 2010 and 2012
not have as much mcconnell responded? -- how do republicans respond? how does a mitch mcconnell respond? then what happens in the house? there are two questions and with john boehner. is he willing to go in and legislate, especially if he gets a major concessions from the president? in my gut, the answer is yes. can he bring his caucus along? yes, a few of the leading to party leaders were defeated -- tea party members were defeated, but they are still as conservative as they were before last night. we have some issues that could really divide us, like immigration with the president will be moving ahead quickly. the 10 to one of the old days said they would not accept, it may not be 10 to one come and maybe four to one or five to one, but they will get 80% of what they want. can they say yes to only 80%? the final one is the supreme court. what happens if ensign and scalia retires? forget -- antonin scalia retires? forget ginsberg. what happens if obama will appoint the first asian-american to the court? i cannot give you the answers. we will see a lot of bloodletting. goingave no idea
! next. >> leader pelosi -- >> i guess -- >> whoa! >> you always ask that question except to mitch mcconnell. >> oh, mitch mcconnell, the senate minority leader is 70 years old. nancy pelosi is 72. in the world of politics, age is kind of a skewed concept. average age of members of the house is 56. and of senators it's 62. i mean, paul ryan is thought of as a young gun. he's 42. that's eight years shy of being a card-carrying member of the aarp. ronald reagan was 69 when he first ran for president. many worried he was too old for the job until his famous quip during a debate. >> i will not make age an issue of this campaign. i am not going to exploit, for political purposes, my opponent's youth and inexperience. >> yes, reagan used age to his advantage. but seriously, how old is too old? remember senator strom thurman who commuted from walter reed to the capitol at the age of 100? his aides had to vote for him. of course, this argument isn't limited to the world of politics. ageism rages in the role world, too. how often have you heard those under 30 grumbling about those old guys sucking up
about the fiscal cliff right now, whether you're in the white house or your mitch mcconnell, which are trying to devise a some kind of cover for john boehner. the voters last night in the exit polls said that they're willing to take higher taxes but they think the government is too big. that's the deal that banner and obama almost got two years ago. so it's there. is within reach but dana has to be given some kind of cover that he can bring, 140 republican votes with him. it's going to be very difficult to do. obama will have to decide whether he wants to go off the cliff to give it up that preoccupation that we have with bush tax cuts, or whether he's going, the better passers, try to cloak into something big and mushy and do we like tax reform, and stretch it out and let the deal be massaged in such a way to increase revenue and more money for growth. anything to avoid that horrible road called a tax increase. but this is the hard work that is ahead. obama has got to make that decision. >> we heard the last panel toggle bit redistricting and its impact on partisanship, especially
boehner. cut it loose so they can go christmas shopping, senator mcconnell. it's what the people voted for. that's why they voted for me. that's the president talking. we are joined now by nbc's chief white house correspondent chuck todd. thanks for joining us tonight. this was a hot pressure cooker press conference and you were in the middle. let's talk about the president's tactic. it looks like he's got one. here he is sticking out his message of defending the middle class today, sticking to it. he practically dared the republicans to hold tax cuts for the middle class hostage. he went back to that word hostage. let's take a look. >> the other option is to pass a law right now that would prevent any tax hike whatsoever on the first $250,000 of everybody's income. i hope republicans in the house come on board, too. we should not hold the middle class hostage while we debate tax cuts for the wealthy. the most important step we can take right now, i think the foundation for a deal that helps the economy, creates jobs, gives consumersty, which means gives consumers confidence they'll have c
with john boehner, the senate republican leader mitch mcconnell. is he planning on sitting down with those two republican leaders any time soon? is the white house saying? >> reporter: there's nothing announced for a leaders meeting so far. but i am certain, wolf, that that will be coming because there's such important negotiations ahead. i'm told that the president's conversation with speaker boehner was courteous, it was brief. and i'm told that they also discussed the importance of keeping their public statements vague or general enough so that they leave themselves enough private negotiating room to get a deal done to avoid the fiscal cliff, wolf. >> that's probably smart too. thanks very much for that, jessica. let's dig a little bit deeper right now with our chief political analyst gloria borger. isn't his responsibility right now though to take the first step, offer a proposal to boehner, to mcconnell, to the republicans? we assume that the democrats, nancy pelosi would go along and harry reid would go along with the president. >> well, i think as jessica's saying, the president bel
world, whether it can get through with mitch mcconnell in the senate and republicans in the house is unclear, but i think the white house will give a big push to that. secondly, remember, as bad as the republican super pacs did, the democratic super pacs, although they didn't spend as much money did quite well. you will see a big focus on who their big donors were. and there were some -- >> okay. that's one other example at work. i'm told by the pros like you, john, that one thing that did succeed in terms of big spending was the attempt -- the success, rather, in defining mitt romney early on by the white house people and their allies. >> absolutely incredible. priorities usa action, they made a bunch of really strategic decisions. they didn't have that much money relative to the larger republican conservative super pacs. they decided to go in hard into certain states, particularly ohio, where they spent the bulk of their money. they ran a bunch of ads that were incredibly -- that got an aincredible amount of attention in terms of they got a lot of air time in terms of what they
've heard or if you've heard anything from senator mcconnell and what you think his role in this is going to be and -- [inaudible] >> well, i would hope that he and speaker boehner, in most things they work together, and i guess on fiscal reform senator -- speaker boehner has taken the lead. but my view is if, that again, if we'd hear some voices from the mainstream republicans in the country, particularly business, it would make it a lot easier for senator mcconnell to come to an agreement, come to part of that agreement. >> sam? >> well, i was going to -- [inaudible] >> go ahead. >> so what's going to happen and then a broad question on how you see the democratic party entering this phase of government versus two years ago or even some of 2011 when the -- [inaudible] >> okay. yep, i'll answer the second question first. i think democrats, we've, you know, why, for instance -- i think we've gotten much better at focusing both our policies and our message on middle class folks. i think we understand the dilemma that the middle -- the middle class, just take a step back. you know, the ameri
term. what's your response? >> always ask that question except to mitch mcconnell. >> delay younger leadership from the house democratic ranks? >> let's for a moment honor that that's a legitimate question. it's quite offensive. you don't realize it, i guess. the fact is that everything that i have done in my i guess decade now of leadership, is to elect younger and newer people to the congress. >> well, there's a lot going on there, gender, age. let me throw it to you. >> well, there are plenty of land mines there, but basically nancy pelosi has been saying that she has worked very hard on behalf of the party, she raised a lot of money. she has been often the very visible target of republicans. we certainly saw that in 2010. she described having an insatiable need to stay in this political game and to be part of the important work that is yet to be done. there are many who have told me that they were a bit surprised that she chose to stay on. others who have said she told not even some of her close associates on capitol hill what her plans were. but her posture certainly led to a s
are already digging in their heels. speaker boehner, senator minority leader mitch mcconnell, paul ryan. all of them saying they will fight the president on taxes. all of them saying the president doesn't have a mandate. but president obama has something to say about that. >> i have one mandate. i have a mandate to help middle class families and families that are working hard to try to get into the middle class. that's my mandate. >> this is a clear message. it's what americans voted for a week ago. are you sure you want this fight, republicans? democrat from pennsylvania chuck fatah and ezra klein, msnbc policy analyst. he's writing about the fight over taxes today and the piece is called "the big question: how, not whether, to raise taxes." thank you for joining me tonight. >> thank you. >> good to be here. >> congressman, do you think republicans will make a deal or is this 2010 with the tea party all over again? >> well, what the public needs to understand is the income tax system is not fair to them. there is a report done by the congress each year by the joint committee on taxation. sh
assess what's going to happen with republicans like speaker john boehner and mitch mcconnell? how does the president persuade them to lay down their pledges to grover norquist and commit to the nation? >> well, ultimately the president is not going to persuade them. ultimately the voters have to persuade them. i think john boehner and a few others in the republican party have got to tell eric cantor and paul ryan and michele bachmann and a lot of the tea partiers in that party, if you continue to insist that taxes are not going to be increased on the rich, we are not going to ever gain or regain control of the senate. we're going to lose control of the house in 2014, 2016. we're going to become a permanent minority party because it makes no sense to most americans. >> hit them where it hurts. professor robert reich, thank you. >>> next, how far will the president go in the showdown against john mccain. >>> but first, hampton pearson has the cnbc market wrap. good afternoon. >> good afternoon. we saw stocks move lower again on more wall street fears of going over the fiscal cliff. the d
, a very different tune than mitch mcconnell four years ago, pledging his only responsibility, job number one, was to see this was a one-term president. so that's some groundwork for the president also, where he's got a playing field that will be much more easier for him to reach out. again, i think he initially saw this campaign as a referendum on the way that republicans governed. if you look at those exit polls, it does show that there is support for the way the president wants to reform the tax code, raising taxes on the middle class, having those bush tax cuts expire. so there is some momentum that he has. it's not a clear, clear mandate because the popular vote, i think, was so close, but on that electoral map, it was a real walloping for republicans and the way that they have governed and the way they have gone about approaching very important issues. this is a big, big time. i agree with carl. this was a referendum on progressive ideas. i think it's a real victory for progressives. you see 20 women going into the senate, all of those issues around abortion are very, very played ve
of them make a deal stick? even if mcconnell and reid both tried to put something together, they have some exotic people on their side. you are absolutely right, and then toss in one more factor. you've got all the dysfunctional capitol hill, and then you have a president that basically has no relationship whatsoever with congress on either side. virtually no interaction with members of congress. wow. >> i don't agree with anything charlie just said. no, i agree with everything he just said. the key mayb be whether the president shows decisive leadership. i don't think decisive leadership necessarily is what he showed a lot of the time in the first term. not that he did not show any leadership. he did not get his hands really dirty. the public option fight we had, if you send it to may i will sign it. he let nancy pelosi take the lead on the public option, and on a lot of things. we knew what he preferred, but he did not twist arms. he just did not seem to get involved in the details. is he going to do that now? if he does that, is he going to just -- well, i got a second term, we pick up
. what you're hearing from boehner and mcconnell in washington speak is we don't want a deal, we don't want to go off the cliff and the only thing left is to punt. and i think that's a dangerous place as well because this is the issue one of the few times congress might be forced to actually do its job and get a budget passed for the american people. so when this question comes up about the bigger issue are we going to get a deal or not, what i'm hearing from boehner is no and the president yes. >> but the president's leverage doesn't go away if you punt for six months. i mean, it's not clear to me -- i agree with you that's one way to read the boehner/mcconnell position. >> you do the blue ribbon panel, try to make it binding, do the supercommittee -- >> need to know because after all at the end of january most americans will like to start filing for their refunds. that's why we have to do something. and the other thing we failed to mention over and over about these so-called bush tax cuts is that they have helped increase the deficit over the last ten years. we simply cannot afford
their caucuses? and even if mcconnell and reid tried to put something together, they both have pretty exotic people on their side and so, no, you're absolutely right. and toss in one more factor, that you have got all of the dysfunction on capitol hill and then you have a president that basically has no relationship whatsoever with congress on either side. basically no interaction with members of congress. >> let me add, first of all, i don't agree with anything -- no, i agree with everything charlie just said. the key may be whether the president shows decisive leadership. don't know what you all think or charlie thinks. i don't think decisive leadership necessarily is what he showed a lot of the time in the first term. it's not that he didn't show any leadership. i mean he stated that general position, suggestions, ideas, philosophies, health care reform. but he didn't get his hands really dirty. republican the public options fight. if you send it to me, i will sign it. you know, he let nancy pelosi take the lead on the public option and a lot of things. we knew where he stood. we knew wha
to happen with the republican party. [video clip] >> the republican national chairman, mitch mcconnell, john boehner, and other republican leaders behind the epic election failure of 2012 should be replaced with leaders more in tune with the conservative base of the republican party. likewise, established republican consultants establishedkarl rove, romney campaign senior advisers, and pollsters should never be hired to run or consult on a national campaign again. nobody would give a dime to the ineffective super pacs like american crossroads. the loss was the death rattle of the establishment republican party. the disaster of 2012 signals the beginning of the battle to take over the republican party and the opportunity to establish the gop as the party of small government, constitutional conservative. host: do you agree with that assessment? guest: not at all. k i do karl rove, the pollster for the romney campaign, and all the others he listed, the republican national chairman -- they are not the problem. the truth is, while i think the tea party is a great addition to the party, the candid
mcconnell of kentucky and other party leaders will include john cornyn of texas and he will succeed john kafeel as the minority whip and they've also announced today the national republican senatorial committee will be headed by rob portman and the culture will be the senator looked from texas, ted cruz from capitol hill. treasury secretary to m. geithner spoke yesterday about the fiscal cliff and the financial situation. he was part of the annual wall street journal ceo conference in the nation's conference. his comments are about a half-hour. >> the people in this room we told them before you got here and buy through the beat code 2-1 they do not expect a deal before we hit the cliff. no more information although there is a bit of a highlight of the dominican republic which we haven't figured out. [laughter] i think there is a lot of anxiety in this room about the fiscal clef. do you think that we are going to go over the cliff or are you confident your site can get a deal with the other side before we get there? >> we will have to see that there is every reason to believe that this is
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 62 (some duplicates have been removed)